Project Steering Group

The Project Steering Group is made up of members very committed to the environment, from a very wide range of organisations and backgrounds.

Professors Andrea Liggins and Mike Christie are leading the AHRC funded part of the project, and Sarah Tombs is leading with Andrea, the Arts Council of Wales funded parts of the project (the production of the art works and the community projects).

Other members of the project steering group are -Dr Natasha de Vere, Head of Science and Conservation at the National Botanic Garden of Wales; Dr Sarah Beynon, Dr Beynon’s Bug farm; Sinead Lynch, Bumblebee Conservation Trust; Dr Sophie Bennett, Aberystwyth University; Professor Catrin Webster, University of Wales Trinity Saint David; Dr Paul Jeff, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Daniel Trivedy, the Arts Council of Wales, Katrina Hodges – committee secretary.

DETAILS TO BE ADDED SHORTLY

Andrea Liggins ret copy   Professor Andrea Liggins in 2014 retired as the Dean of the Faculty of Art and Design at University of Wales TSD, and is now an Emeritus Professor of Photography. She holds a PhD in Photography and Landscape 2005, and achieved a Personal Chair in Photographic Studies in 2007. She is a photographic artist and exhibitions of her photography have been shown in Russia, China, India, across Europe and the UK, and she is included in Land Matters, Landscape Photography, Culture and Identity, a cultural history of landscape photography by Liz Wells. During 2011 Liggins developed a new strand to her work and made photographic portraits of famous illustrators worldwide, for a book publication and international touring exhibition. She has continued this portraiture of artists in Wales, using mostly low-resolution plastic cameras. She continues with a long-term photographic project that explores alternative ways of engaging with landscape/space to engender a greater sense of involvement. She has extended this work into leading this AHRC and Arts Council Wales funded initiative, ‘Cross-pollination- Revaluing Pollinators through Arts and Science Collaboration’.

GetFileAttachment Professor Mike Christie was appointed Professor of Environmental and Ecological Economics in the School of Management and Business in 2012. He has a BSc (Hons) degree in Agriculture (1992) and PhD in Environmental Economics (1998): both from Aberdeen University. He is Executive Member of the UK Network of Environmental Economics and the Ecosystem Service Partnership, and Associated Editor of the Ecosystem Services journal. He teaches microeconomics and environmental / ecological economics.

His research interests are in Environmental and Ecological Economics, specialising in the economic and social valuation of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Other areas of expertise include: outdoor recreation, tourism, agri-environment, and economic impact. Recent research projects have been funded by NERC’s VNN, BESS and ESPA programmes, as well more applied Defra research on e.g. the ecosystem service value of the UK BAP and SSSIs. Increasingly, his research has focused on examining the human welfare impacts of biodiversity loss in developing countries, with recent studies in Malawi, Nigeria, Ghana, the Solomon Islands and the Caribbean. He also contributed to TEEB and the UK National Ecosystem Assessment, and has ran various capacity building courses for UNEP on Ecosystem Assessments in Africa, Asia, Caribbean and South America.

Screen Shot 2017-05-01 at 16.55.59cr Sarah Tombs is a sculptor whose work is concerned with the sculptural tradition of ‘site’ and material, and explores the relationship of context and place, often in public spaces.

Since 1987 Sarah has produced many major public commissions, both nationally and internationally.  She is currently working on a commission to make a large public sculpture for the National Burns Centre, Morriston Hospital. The project involves the staff of the Hospital and Port Talbot community, and is the subject of a documentary film.

As part of an artist-led group, Sculpture Cymru, Sarah has worked with CADW and the National Botanic Garden of Wales. She has curated, project managed and produced art work for several site-responsive exhibitions in Wales, culminating in collaborative art-science projects investigating possibilities to create and reveal innovative strategies.

Sarah is a also a freelance lecturer in art at the National Gallery, London, where she has an extensive track record of work with the public and local communities.